Wise Words Sunday

In the Shadows

“Without  black, no color has any depth.
But if you mix black with everything, suddenly there’s shadow –
no, not just shadow, but fullness.
You’ve got to be willing to  mix black into your palette
if you want to create something that’s  real.”

Amy Grant

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Consider joining in, won’t you?

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Posted on January 13, 2013, in Wise Words Sunday and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 18 Comments.

  1. What an interesting quote. Your image is a good example of the need for and use of black.

    • Thanks Anita. I found that quote a good reminder that in photography as well as life, both light and dark are needed to create something beautiful.

  2. It’s the yin-yang principle, isn’t it? Opposites are interconnected and interdependent. Such a beautiful window, captured so skillfully.

    • Yes, it is – the idea of yin-yang fits so well here -with that idea that both are necessary to make the whole complete. It is our willingness to accept life’s dark moments that give richness to the light.

  3. Very true words! Love the shadows and light on the window! Beautiful texture, too!

  4. This post was a good reminder to me to make sure my blacks are black in my photos. Thanks!

  5. What a lovely quote…and so true. I don’t think I’ve ever quite thought of black in quite that way before. I guess it’s all about finding the ‘just right’ balance.

    • Yes – aren’t we all in pursuit of that “just right” balance – between the darks and lights, black and white, the yin and yang? I found this quote quite thought-provoking – to remember the necessity of the dark to make the lights more meaningful.

  6. I love the cut of the shadows and play of light breaking this otherwise symmetrical image. This quote did not throw my mind into a photographic reference, but reminded me of my clothes obsessed mother (sitll is) who would not allow me to wear black as a child. I never embraced it until my 30’s as I thought for some reason it was bad to wear. She totally dissed black…that just ain’t right.
    As always your thoughts and images cause pause. To me, a mark of something wonderfully artistic.

    • Oh, well – your Mom would certainly NOT approve of my color choices – I quite love black. It’s that slimming quality 🙂 I am glad this quote made you pause – it’s why I included it as it made me think as well.

  7. Beautiful shadowy image here Brenda.

    • Thanks Leanne. I was initially intriqued by the lamppost shadow falling across this window and the original image contained more of that shadow. In the cropped and straightened version you see here, it is a little more mysterious as to what that shadow actually is – but that mystery kind of appealed to me.

  8. Brenda! What an incredible image! I just love it…the classical lines and motifs, the shades of grey, the long shadow cast across the diagonal. So much beauty…and some intrigue, too. Me, I love black..I love this quote..and I love this image! A trifecta of gorgeousness!

    • Juli – this window graces the side of an old downtown hotel which is currently being renovated. Who can resist those lovely architectural details from an earlier time? On this day, the early morning sun was out in full force and the lamppost across the street threw its shadow across the window in that interesting diagonal; the looming shadow from the building across the street made itself felt on the left side and there it was – this image.

  9. Love the simple composition and gorgeous textures here Brenda–the quote is a great reminder that beauty can be very counterintuitive.

    • Yes, that quote was a througt-provoking one for me – both in terms of our art as well as in life in general. Embracing the “black” improves both.

  10. True, in photos, in life, in writing. Yes.

    • Lisa – this quote was unfamiliar to me when I stumbled across it in my research for WWS. But it did strike a chord – about accepting, and even welcoming, the dark in order to have contrast with the light.

I greatly appreciate your comments!

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